Factsheets

Documents

Cooking with Pulses: A New Era for an Ancient Crop  Published Popular

819 downloads

Pulses are consumed by the kilo in Africa and Asia, but surprisingly absent on Western menus. That is about to change; the secret is out about pulses.

Health Benefits of Pulses (FAO)  Published Popular

2722 downloads


IYP Factsheet Pulses and Rural Development  Published Popular

1107 downloads


Legumes: Start a Healthy Habit  Published Popular

748 downloads

Enjoying legumes more often is a healthy habit and once you start you won’t stop! Legumes are nutrient rich, containing dietary fibre, protein, carbohydrates (mostly low glycemic index) as well as phytonutrients, B group vitamins and minerals such as iron, zinc, calcium and magnesium.

Legumes: Tips and tricks to enjoying them more often  Published Popular

639 downloads

Legumes like chickpeas, lentils and kidney beans are full of nutrients, inexpensive and good for you. So why not try some today? We’ve put together some hints and ideas to get you started.

Lifting the Lid on Legumes - The benefits of choosing legumes  Published Popular

668 downloads

Legumes such as beans, lentils, peas and soy foods are an important part of a healthy diet.

Meet Pulses: The Health Powerhouses  Published Popular

783 downloads

Pulses, in technical terms, are the dry, edible seeds of plants in the legume family. In understandable terms, they’re a category of superfoods that includes chickpeas, lentils, dry peas, and dry beans. They’re incredibly healthy, which is one reason the United Nations declared 2016 as the International Year of Pulses.

Meet Pulses: The Next Big Superfood Category  Published Popular

675 downloads

In technical terms, they’re the dry, edible seeds of plants in the legume family. In understandable terms, they’re a category of superfoods that includes chickpeas, lentils, dry peas, and bean varieties. They’re also incredibly healthy, affordable, sustainable and tasty.

Meet Pulses: The Sustainable Superfoods  Published Popular

674 downloads

In technical terms, pulses are the dry, edible seeds of plants in the legume family. In understandable terms, they’re a category of superfoods that includes chickpeas, lentils, dry peas, and beans. They’re also incredibly sustainable, why is part of why the United Nations declared 2016 as the International Year of Pulses.

Meet Pulses: The World’s Most Versatile Superfood  Published Popular

650 downloads

In technical terms, pulses are the dry, edible seeds of plants in the legume family. In understandable terms, they’re a category of superfoods that includes chickpeas, lentils, dry peas, and beans. They’re incredibly healthy, affordable, tasty and versatile – they can be used in everything from main courses to desserts.

Nutritional Benefits of Pulses (FAO)  Published Popular

883 downloads


Orphan Crops: a solution to global food system risks and an investment opportunity for future agricultural research  Published Popular

726 downloads

"Orphan crops" are crops that are largely grown and used locally by communities. They are not part of the main crops that are traded internationally and which have often been considered staple crops, such as rice or maize. Several pulses are considered orphan crops, along with certain types of cereals, fruits, nuts, vegetables, roots, tubers and oil seeds. For example, in Africa, several types of beans such as cowpeas are considered "orphan crops".

Pulses and Biodiversity (FAO)  Published Popular

824 downloads


Pulses and Climate Change (FAO)  Published Popular

997 downloads


Pulses and Food Security  Published Popular

974 downloads

In most developing countries, pulses play a fundamental role as a low-fat, high fibre source of protein, an essential component of traditional food baskets. Pulses, by contributing about 10 percent in the daily protein intake and 5 percent in energy intake, are of particular importance for food security in low income countries where the major sources of proteins are non-animal products. In addition, pulses also contain significant amounts of other essential nutrients like calcium, iron and lysine. Pulses are included in all ‘food baskets’ and dietary guidelines. The World Food Programme (WFP) for instance includes 60 grams of pulses in its typical food basket, alongside cereals, oils and sugar and salt.

Pulses and Nutrition  Published Popular

826 downloads

Nutritional information sourced from the USDA Nutrient Database, antioxidant data as published in Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, June 9, 2004;

Pulses and Rural Development  Published Popular

796 downloads

Pulses are economically important crops for farmers, in both developing and developed countries. Pulses are are traditionally mostly grown in developing countries, which contribute 70% of pulse production globally (except for dry peas). For instance, India produces about a quarter of the world’s pulses, which in 2011 amounted to 17 millions tonnes.

Pulses Contribute to Food Security (FAO)  Published Popular

904 downloads


The Many Nutritional Benefits of Pulses  Published Popular

2120 downloads

Pulses may significantly improve global nutrition, help eradicate hunger and tackle many chronic health conditions, such as obesity and diabetes.